Windows 10 geekery query

Uncle Menno

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#1
Aging and increasingly cranky desktop that is nevertheless current on Windows 10. Perhaps out of an over-developed sense of caution, I’ve ordered a replacement. But the migration? AARRGGHH! Data doesn’t seem to be too much of a problem, but stuff like apps whose disks have hidden themselves somewhere, profiles, Mrs. Menno’s 13,497 saved passwords, etc.?Should I just clone the old drive, or is there a package that will migrate everything without costing me more than the replacement unit?
 

dvair

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#2
Windows 10 seems a lot better at starting with new hardware, just built myself a new system. Took hard drive out of old one and put into new one with no issues (both were Intel systems) just had to run the new drivers once Windows was running. Took my old system and used that to replace another even older one that was base on Nvidia Nforce chipset. What I did was run the Intel chipset drivers for the board before I changed everything out. Put that drive into my old system and it started right up. All were running Windows 10 pro.

I would make a backup of the drive and put it into the new machine and see what happens. Three are some cloning software out there that say they have Universal restore ( can restore to any hardware)
 

Uncle Menno

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#3
Windows 10 seems a lot better at starting with new hardware, just built myself a new system. Took hard drive out of old one and put into new one with no issues (both were Intel systems) just had to run the new drivers once Windows was running. Took my old system and used that to replace another even older one that was base on Nvidia Nforce chipset. What I did was run the Intel chipset drivers for the board before I changed everything out. Put that drive into my old system and it started right up. All were running Windows 10 pro.

I would make a backup of the drive and put it into the new machine and see what happens. Three are some cloning software out there that say they have Universal restore ( can restore to any hardware)
Hmmm...maybe I can yank the new drive, put it into the old machine as a secondary drive, copy c: over to it as a bootable, yank it and put it back into the new machine?

In the meantime, the replacement machine has arrived. I fired it up and it seems OK, although Dell apparently no longer stuffs their refurbs with useful freebies. It did come with wifi built in, though. And a pox on this Microsoft account business.
 

Uncle Menno

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#4
Ugh. So of course I managed to lock myself out of my new machine. Tried all password permutations I could think of but nothing worked. Now resetting it completely. Fortunately, there wasn’t really anything on it.
 

dvair

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#5
LOL, that's why I don't use a password to log into my machine. Just go to the Users menu and tell it to use a local account.

Whatever you do with the drives, just make sure you have a good backup of the original. That way you can play around and if something happens you stuff is still there.
 
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